Persepolis IRAN,Shiraz Back

Persepolis (Capital of Persia in Greek) or Takht-e Jamshid (The Throne of Jamshid) became summer capital of Achaemenian after Pasargadae. The construction of this impressive palace started by Darius I, one of Cyrus's successors, in about 518 BC. was completed over a period of 150 years by subsequent kings Xerxes I and Artaxerxes I. It was burned down during Alexander the Great occupation in 331 BC. Historians debate whether was accidental or intentional retaliation. When you enter the area, you go up the stairs. There are 106 steps about 23 ft wide. At the top of the stairs the first thing you see is Xerxes Gateway with three separate doors and a hallway. The remaining doors are covered with inscriptions and carvings in ancient languages. To the east you can see the double headed eagles. To the south of gateway, look for the Apadana Palace (audience hall) where kings received visitors and celebrated Noruz (the Persian New Year). Persepolis was occupied only on great occasions of national importance. There are almost no signs of daily wear. It is unknown as to how many people lived in and around Persepolis, but it is guessed to be in the thousands or tens of thousands. Since the entire project was over a 150 year time span there were at least six generations of workers born, worked and died during the life of the project. It is unknown as to how many people lived in and around Persepolis, but it is guessed to be in the thousands or tens of thousands. Since the entire project was over a 150 year time span there were at least six generations of workers born, worked and died during the life of the project.

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